Saturday, August 20, 2016

2016 Fall Special, 20% off tuition for New Students

20 % off End of summer Enrollment for 
New Students:
Enroll now to guarantee your placement.


Oil Painting in progress, by Marie Casne, 
When: Monday, Tuesday, 6-9 pm and Saturday 11:00 -2:00
(All classes scheduled above except, Monday, must be full before the next class is open for enrollment).
Where: 824 Tenth Street, Huntington, WV
Tuition: 20% off tuition for September. 4 week session.

For additional information contact Patricia @ 304-416-2081

Or email: patriciareed.artist@gmail.com


and: paintedpaletteartstudio.com


We accept all credit cards

Saturday, July 16, 2016

Friday, December 4, 2015

December Artist- Cathy Huff










Shih tzu and Tulips, by Cathy Huff, All rights reserved by artist



Shih tzu and Tulips, oil on canvas, by Cathy Huff .
Cathy has been a student of the Painted Palette for a few years now. She has painted landscapes, still lifes and has recently  been working on a series of canine portraits.
This one is one of my favorites. Cathy and  I enjoyed the progress of this painting from beginning to end.  It developed from a composite of photos. She tried a new approach to her canine portraits and painted a  very successful portrait.Shih tzu and Tulips, oil on canvas, by Cathy Huff .
Cathy has been a student of the Painted Palette for a few years now. She has painted landscapes, still lifes and has recently  been working on a series of canine portraits.
This one is one of my favorites. Cathy and  I enjoyed the progress of this painting from beginning to end.  It developed from a composite of photos. She tried a new approach to her canine portraits and painted a  very successful portrait.
Sleepy Puppies, by Cathy Huff, All rights reserved by artist

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Painted Palette Fine Art Studio and Gallery: PAINTED PALETTE CLASS ENROLLMENT

Painted Palette Fine Art Studio and Gallery: PAINTED PALETTE CLASS ENROLLMENT: OIL/ACRYLIC PAINTING CLASSES Blue and White Pitcher, by Patricia Reed, All Rights Reserved by artist. Oil on Canvas, 24 X3...

PAINTED PALETTE CLASS ENROLLMENT



OIL/ACRYLIC PAINTING CLASSES





Blue and White Pitcher, by Patricia Reed, All Rights Reserved by artist.
Oil on Canvas, 24 X30"


 PAINTING CLASS SCHEDULE

Oil/Acrylic Painting Classes :New Classes begins: Six Week  'Introduction to Oil Painting’ -
When: - Saturday, December 19, 2015 
Time: 11:00 - 2:00
Tuition $ 187.25. 

The intro class is designed for those interested in acquiring and/or continuing the fundamental skills of Fine Art Painting. 

Reserve your class now. Contact: the Painted Palette, 304-416-2081 for enrollment information.

Oil /AcrylicPainting Classes: Six Week Intermediate to advanced classes.
When: - Monday,   December 14, 2015,  
Time: 6:00 - 9:00 p.m
Tuition $ 187.25.
Reserve your class. Contact the Painted Palette, 304-416-2081 for enrollment information.

If you miss the class starting dates above contact me at 304-416-2081 for next class date.


Patricia Reed
Patricia Reed at Fine Art America





*For students anticipating payment for classes, click on this link to pay for your classes: Tuition Payment Link
Visit: Painted Palette Fine Art Studio, 824 Tenth Street, Huntington, WV 25701 Tel: (304) 4162081

Friday, September 12, 2014

James McNeil Whistler

“James McNeill Whistler & the Case for Beauty,”
Catch a new documentary, “James McNeill Whistler & the Case for Beauty,” premiering on PBS this Friday, September 12 at 9pm ET! Take a close look at how the 19th-century American expatriate artist pioneered a new way of thinking about art. 

A controversial artist in his time, James Whistler’s “Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl” was at the center of an important late nineteenth century aesthetic debate. To mark the PBS television special, a special gallery talk by educators David Gariff and Eric Denker will argue the two sides of this debate alongside “The Woman in White”. If you’re in the DC area, join us for upcoming talks at 12pm on September 30 and October 2.

By the 1860s, the British public and critics had been conditioned by Victorian writers and artists to admire contemporary pictures for their ability to convey a narrative. Critics, including the dean of Victorian aesthetic criticism John Ruskin, stressed the importance of storytelling in painting for the educational and moral instruction of the audience. The establishment also had high regard for the smooth, enamel-like finish that characterized official painting both in England and in France.

The iconic image of “The Woman in White” had the distinction of being rejected both at the Royal Academy in London in 1862 and at the official French exhibition, the Paris Salon of 1863. It was subsequently shown at the famous Salon des Refusés in Paris in 1863 where it became, alongside Edouard Manet’s “Dejeuner sur l’herbe,” one of the most celebrated works of the realist avant-garde. Critics on both sides of the English Channel proclaimed it had underlying symbolic meaning, but Whistler always insisted it was a symphony in white, a formal exercise devoid of hidden narrative. In the late 1870s Whistler began to refer to it as “Symphony in White, #1” to stress its abstract and poetic qualities.

Whistler’s image of his Irish model and mistress, Jo Hiffernan, seemed patently anarchical to 1860s audiences. The life-size scale of the figure, previously reserved for figures of great stature and national importance, was employed here for a disheveled studio model. The restrained harmony of color and the heavily painted surface of obvious brushwork were likewise at odds with official Victorian taste.

Whistler had come of age as a painter in the long shadow of Courbet and the realist movement in art in France in the 1850s. As a realist, the young American expatriate preferred subjects drawn from contemporary life to the biblical and historical narratives admired in more conservative art circles. Beyond his choice of subject matter, Whistler asserted the independence of art from storytelling and anecdote. He approached art from a more purely aesthetic viewpoint, considering painting to be the parallel of music in its quest for harmony and balance.

James McNeill Whistler, “Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl,” 1862, oil on canvas http://1.usa.gov/12V9Tgd
Photo: Catch a new documentary, “James McNeill Whistler & the Case for Beauty,” premiering on PBS this Friday, September 12 at 9pm ET! Take a close look at how the 19th-century American expatriate artist pioneered a new way of thinking about art. 

A controversial artist in his time, James Whistler’s “Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl” was at the center of an important late nineteenth century aesthetic debate. To mark the PBS television special, a special gallery talk by educators David Gariff and Eric Denker will argue the two sides of this debate alongside “The Woman in White”. If you’re in the DC area, join us for upcoming talks at 12pm on September 30 and October 2. 

By the 1860s, the British public and critics had been conditioned by Victorian writers and artists to admire contemporary pictures for their ability to convey a narrative. Critics, including the dean of Victorian aesthetic criticism John Ruskin, stressed the importance of storytelling in painting for the educational and moral instruction of the audience. The establishment also had high regard for the smooth, enamel-like finish that characterized official painting both in England and in France.  

The iconic image of “The Woman in White” had the distinction of being rejected both at the Royal Academy in London in 1862 and at the official French exhibition, the Paris Salon of 1863. It was subsequently shown at the famous Salon des Refusés in Paris in 1863 where it became, alongside Edouard Manet’s “Dejeuner sur l’herbe,” one of the most celebrated works of the realist avant-garde. Critics on both sides of the English Channel proclaimed it had underlying symbolic meaning, but Whistler always insisted it was a symphony in white, a formal exercise devoid of hidden narrative. In the late 1870s Whistler began to refer to it as “Symphony in White, #1” to stress its abstract and poetic qualities.   

Whistler’s image of his Irish model and mistress, Jo Hiffernan, seemed patently anarchical to 1860s audiences.  The life-size scale of the figure, previously reserved for figures of great stature and national importance, was employed here for a disheveled studio model. The restrained harmony of color and the heavily painted surface of obvious brushwork were likewise at odds with official Victorian taste.

Whistler had come of age as a painter in the long shadow of Courbet and the realist movement in art in France in the 1850s. As a realist, the young American expatriate preferred subjects drawn from contemporary life to the biblical and historical narratives admired in more conservative art circles. Beyond his choice of subject matter, Whistler asserted the independence of art from storytelling and anecdote. He approached art from a more purely aesthetic viewpoint, considering painting to be the parallel of music in its quest for harmony and balance. 

James McNeill Whistler, “Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl,” 1862, oil on canvas http://1.usa.gov/12V9Tgd